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Saturday, August 18, 2018

Posts Tagged ‘emergency communication’
Placing a 9-1-1 Call—What You Should Know
Wednesday, April 1st, 2015

When an emergency, such as a fire occurs, it’s easy to become panicked and confused. As a result, many 9-1-1 calls made to emergency dispatchers are often not complete, thus hindering the fire department’s ability to arrive quickly to the scene. By knowing what to expect when you call 9-1-1 and making a few simple preparations, you can steer clear of the common mistakes people make when they place an emergency phone call.

• Keep the 9-1-1 number posted on every telephone in your house and ask neighbors to do the same. Make the call from inside your home only if you are trapped. Otherwise, get out, report to your family’s agreed upon meeting place, and call the fire department from a neighbor’s phone or cell phone.

• Speak clearly and calmly. Give the dispatcher the location of the emergency and a brief description of the incident you are reporting. Be prepared to answer questions such as location, address, name, and telephone number. Stay on the phone until you have answered all the dispatcher’s questions and he or she says it’s OK to hang up. Help is being dispatched at the same time the call taker is continuing to gather additional information. If your call is a medical emergency, the dispatcher will provide pre-arrival medical instructions telling you what to do before medics arrive.

• Do not program 9-1-1 into your phone. It is too easy to accidentally call the number. If you dial 9-1-1 in error, DO NOT hang up. With the enhanced 9-1-1 features in our area, the caller’s address and telephone number is automatically identified for the dispatcher’s reference. Instead, stay on the line and let the dispatcher know you made a mistake. Otherwise he/she will send emergency crews to your address and needlessly tie up resources from real emergencies.

Guest Contributor & Article Credits: Fire Marshal Alan Perkins, CFPS (Live Safe Foundation, Liaison to the Fire Department Community) – Alan’s career in the fire service spans more than 30 years. He is a Certified Fire Protection Specialist through the National Fire Protection Association and a member of numerous similar safety organizations. Alan consults with numerous fire departments throughout Ohio and in 2005 was chosen by the Ohio Department of Health as the fire service member on the Ohio School Inspection Advisory Committee. He was also awarded Ohio Fire Official of the Year in 2009 by the Ohio Building Officials Association. Alan is the Fire Marshal for the Washington Township Fire Department in Dublin, Ohio. The Washington Township Fire Department provides fire prevention, fire suppression, emergency medical services, and education and safety programs for Washington Township, which encompasses parts of Franklin, Delaware and Union Counties.

Live Safe Foundation is an Ohio based non-profit organization (501c3), devoted to making and fire and life safety education, awareness initiatives and life saving tools available on a broad basis to communities, campuses, and institutions in an effort to reduce national fire fatalities and fire losses.


Placing a 9-1-1 Call—What You Should Know
Friday, February 21st, 2014

When an emergency, such as a fire occurs, it’s easy to become panicked and confused. As a result, many 9-1-1 calls made to emergency dispatchers are often not complete, thus hindering the fire department’s ability to arrive quickly to the scene. By knowing what to expect when you call 9-1-1 and making a few simple preparations, you can steer clear of the common mistakes people make when they place an emergency phone call.

  • Keep the 9-1-1 number posted on every telephone in your house and ask neighbors to do the same. Make the call from inside your home only if you are trapped. Otherwise, get out, report to your family’s agreed upon meeting place, and call the fire department from a neighbor’s phone or cell phone.
  • Speak clearly and calmly. Give the dispatcher the location of the emergency and a brief description of the incident you are reporting. Be prepared to answer questions such as location, address, name, and telephone number. Stay on the phone until you have answered all the dispatcher’s questions and he or she says it’s OK to hang up. Help is being dispatched at the same time the call taker is continuing to gather additional information. If your call is a medical emergency, the dispatcher will provide pre-arrival medical instructions telling you what to do before medics arrive. Use for Useless feeling
  • Do not program 9-1-1 into your phone. It is too easy to accidentally call the number. If you dial 9-1-1 in error, DO NOT hang up. With the enhanced 9-1-1 features in our area, the caller’s address and telephone number is automatically identified for the dispatcher’s reference. Instead, stay on the line and let the dispatcher know you made a mistake. Otherwise he/she will send emergency crews to your address and needlessly tie up resources from real emergencies.
  • If you use a cell phone to place an emergency call, the dispatcher receives your call back number and the approximate location from which you are calling. It is imperative that you stay on the line and tell the dispatcher the exact location of the emergency.
  • Make sure your house number is displayed with large numbers (at least four inches high) in a contrasting color that can be seen easily from the road. If your home is situated far off the road, be sure your driveway is well marked with your street address.
  • Share with your children and family members that making false emergency calls as a joke is a crime that costs lives. False alarms tie up emergency telephone lines and endanger emergency personnel driving to the scene.
  • Once emergency personnel arrive, ensure they have current medical information for your family at their disposal by posting on your refrigerator a Vial of Life form for each member of your family. The Vial of Life form, if completed and kept current, can provide valuable information (medical history, medications, emergency contacts, doctor’s names etc.) that will help paramedics expedite emergency medical treatment and/or transition to a physician’s care. Vial of Life forms are available on the Township’s web site, www.wtwp.com , or by request at 652-3920. They are especially helpful when the person in need of medical care cannot speak or isn’t old enough to be able to provide the necessary information, or when by-standers or family members are panicked or confused and have difficulty remembering all the details paramedics need.

Guest Contributor & Article Credits: Fire Marshal Alan Perkins, CFPS (Live Safe Foundation, Liaison to the Fire Department Community) – Alan’s career in the fire service spans more than 30 years. He is a Certified Fire Protection Specialist through the National Fire Protection Association and a member of numerous similar safety organizations. Alan consults with numerous fire departments throughout Ohio and in 2005 was chosen by the Ohio Department of Health as the fire service member on the Ohio School Inspection Advisory Committee. He was also awarded Ohio Fire Official of the Year in 2009 by the Ohio Building Officials Association. Alan is the Fire Marshal for the Washington Township Fire Department in Dublin, Ohio. The Washington Township Fire Department provides fire prevention, fire suppression, emergency medical services, and education and safety programs for Washington Township, which encompasses parts of Franklin, Delaware and Union Counties.

Live Safe Foundation is an Ohio based non-profit organization (501c3), devoted to making and fire and life safety education, awareness initiatives and life saving tools available on a broad basis to communities, campuses, and institutions in an effort to reduce national fire fatalities and fire losses.


Partners in Prevention is spotlighting April as Effective Emergency Communication
Thursday, April 4th, 2013

Effective emergency communication to large groups in communities with college or institutional campuses is an ongoing challenge and vital for safety. While there is a need to focus on various forms of technology and how to use them for mass communication in time of crises, disseminating basic messages are an effective platform. Most campuses now rely on technology infrastructure for pandemic events such as wildfires and riots. There will be a full complement of radio, television, print as well as email and text messaging options to communicate to our population. Campus buildings will have emergency communication systems such as fire alarms and other voice based warning systems that work in synchronization with fire alarms, to convey appropriate instructions to building occupants. During hurricanes and earthquakes these forms of communication will most likely not be available. Mass communication will have to revert to a low-tech means of communication. Customized message libraries becomes a highly useful emergency management resource readily available for your emergency management community.  Map-out messages (as shown below) to help verify inclusion of all intended recipients, as well as confirming the right formats for distribution and the right length for each type of communication.

 Your Friends at the Live Safe Foundation

Information on the monthly LIVEFIRESAFE campaign is presented in coordination with our Partners in Prevention:

CampusFireSafety.com & Pioneering Technology

Live Safe Foundation is an Ohio based non-profit organization (501c3), devoted to making and fire and life safety education, awareness initiatives and life saving tools available on a broad basis to communities, campuses, and institutions in an effort to reduce national fire fatalities and fire losses.


Winter Preparedness
Friday, January 25th, 2013

Wintry weather such as heavy snowfall, icy conditions and extreme cold can immobilize our area at anytime during the winter. These storms can result in closed or blocked roads, downed power lines and hypothermia. Before the winter storms and extreme cold arrive, make sure you are prepared:

BEFORE the storm

  • Prepare for the possibility that you will need to stay in your home for several days.
  • Be familiar with winter storm warning messages.
  • Service snow removal equipment and have rock salt on hand to melt ice on walkways and kitty litter to generate temporary traction.
  • Make sure you have sufficient heating fuel; regular fuel sources may be cut off.
  • Get a NOAA Weather Radio to monitor severe weather. Be familiar with winter storm warning messages.
  • Assemble a disaster supply kit. Store drinking water, canned/no-cook food, baby formula, pet food, non-electric can opener, first aid kit, battery-powered radio, flashlight and extra batteries, spare blankets and a week’s supply of medication where you can get to them easily, even in the dark. Include specific items such as rock salt to melt ice on walkways, sand to improve traction and other snow removal equipment.

    Be Prepared for Winter Weather!

    Be Prepared for Winter Weather!

  • Ensure that you have sufficient heating fuel for emergency heating equipment in case electricity is cut off. This may include a supply of dry, seasoned wood for your fireplace or wood-burning stoves.
  • House fires pose an additional risk, as more people turn to alternative heating sources such as space heaters without taking the necessary safety precautions. Use approved heating appliances per manufacturer’s instructions. Maintain a three foot clearance between all heaters and combustibles. Keep fire extinguishers on hand, and make sure everyone in your home knows how to use them.
  • Find out ahead of time what you can do to help elderly or disabled friends and neighbors.
  • Develop an emergency communication plan in case family members are separated from one another. This may be necessary if school children are released early due to inclement winter conditions. It’s important to have a plan for getting back together.

Severe Weather Reminders:

Wind Chill

“Wind chill” is a calculation of how cold it feels outside when the effects of temperature and wind speed are combined. A strong wind combined with a temperature of just below freezing can have the same effect as a still air temperature about 35 degrees colder.

Winter Storm Watches and Warnings

  • A winter storm watch indicates that severe winter weather may affect your area. A winter storm warning indicates that severe winter weather conditions are definitely on the way.
  • A blizzard warning means that large amounts of falling or blowing snow and sustained winds of at least 35 miles per hour are expected for several hours.

Frostbite and Hypothermia

  • Frostbite is a severe reaction to cold exposure that can permanently damage its victims. A loss of feeling and a white or pale appearance in fingers, toes, or nose and ear lobes are symptoms of frostbite.
  • Hypothermia is a condition brought on when the body temperature drops to less than 90 degrees Fahrenheit. Symptoms of hypothermia include uncontrollable shivering, slow speech, memory lapses, frequent stumbling, drowsiness, and exhaustion.
  • If frostbite or hypothermia is suspected, begin warming the person slowly and seek immediate medical assistance. Warm the person’s trunk (mid-body) first. Use your own body heat to help. Arms and legs should be warmed last because stimulation of the limbs can drive cold blood toward the heart and lead to heart failure. Put person in dry clothing and wrap their entire body in a blanket.
  • Never give a frostbite or hypothermia victim something with caffeine in it (like coffee or tea) or alcohol. Caffeine, a stimulant, can cause the heart to beat faster and hasten the effects the cold has on the body. Alcohol, a depressant, can slow the heart and also hasten the ill effects of cold body temperatures.

Free copies of Washington Township’s 65-page Emergency Preparedness Manual are available upon request at our Township Administration Building, 6200 Eiterman Road. The manual can also be downloaded at www.wtwp.com.

Article Credits: Fire Marshal Alan Perkins, CFPS (Live Safe Foundation, Liaison to the Fire Department Community) – Alan’s career in the fire service spans more than 30 years. He is a Certified Fire Protection Specialist through the National Fire Protection Association and a member of numerous similar safety organizations. Alan consults with numerous fire departments throughout Ohio and in 2005 was chosen by the Ohio Department of Health as the fire service member on the Ohio School Inspection Advisory Committee. He was also awarded Ohio Fire Official of the Year in 2009 by the Ohio Building Officials Association. Alan is the Fire Marshal for the Washington Township Fire Department in Dublin, Ohio. The Washington Township Fire Department provides fire prevention, fire suppression, emergency medical services, and education and safety programs for Washington Township, which encompasses parts of Franklin, Delaware and Union Counties.

Live Safe Foundation is an Ohio based non-profit organization (501c3), devoted to making and fire and life safety education, awareness initiatives and life saving tools available on a broad basis to communities, campuses, and institutions in an effort to reduce national fire fatalities and fire losses.


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