Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Posts Tagged ‘fire extinguisher’
Home Oxygen Safety
Monday, June 22nd, 2015

The use of oxygen therapy in the home has become increasingly common. A growing older adult population, shorter hospital stays, and home health care services have increased the number of home portable oxygen systems in use. But administering oxygen therapy away from a medical facility, which is typically protected by fire protection systems and stringent safety regulations, and shifting it to an unregulated home environment, increases the fire risk to the user.

Under normal circumstances, room air contains approximately 21% oxygen. Residential oxygen therapy systems increase the percentage of oxygen in the atmosphere around the patient. Oxygen molecules can saturate clothing, fabric, hair, beards and anything in the area. Oxygen is not flammable, but it can cause other materials that burn to ignite more easily and burn far more rapidly. Oxygen is of great benefit to those in need of oxygen therapy but it should always be handled with caution and awareness of the potential hazards. Here are some safety tips to make your home safe during oxygen therapy:

  • Do not smoke or allow others to smoke in your home. Smoking is the leading cause of burns, reported fires, deaths and injuries involving home medical oxygen. Clearly identify that oxygen is in use by placing a sign on your front door. (This may be obtained from the oxygen supply company.)
  • Stay at least five feet away from flame sources such as gas stoves, candles, lighted fireplaces or any other heat sources.
  • Do not use flammable products such as cleaning fluid, paint thinner or aerosol sprays while using oxygen.
  • Make sure oxygen cylinders are well-secured. Oxygen containers should be stored in an upright position. Never tip an oxygen cylinder on its side or try to roll it to a new location.
  • Keep all grease, oil and petroleum products and flammable materials away from your oxygen equipment. Some organic materials can react violently with oxygen if ignited by a hot spark.
  • Use water-based lubricants on your lips and hands. Don’t use an oil-based product like petroleum jelly, petroleum based creams or lotions.
  • Always operate oxygen cylinder or container valves slowly. Abrupt starting and stopping of oxygen flow may ignite any contaminant that might be in the system.
  • When cleaning an oxygen concentrator, make sure it is unplugged. If the machine is wiped down while it is plugged in, a wet cloth cannot be used.
  • Always have your gas supplier’s number available when needed.
  • Ensure that you have an all purpose (ABC) fire extinguisher close by and familiarize yourself with its use.

Guest Contributor & Article Credits: Fire Marshal Alan Perkins, CFPS (Live Safe Foundation, Liaison to the Fire Department Community) – Alan’s career in the fire service spans more than 30 years. He is a Certified Fire Protection Specialist through the National Fire Protection Association and a member of numerous similar safety organizations. Alan consults with numerous fire departments throughout Ohio and in 2005 was chosen by the Ohio Department of Health as the fire service member on the Ohio School Inspection Advisory Committee. He was also awarded Ohio Fire Official of the Year in 2009 by the Ohio Building Officials Association. Alan is the Fire Marshal for the Washington Township Fire Department in Dublin, Ohio. The Washington Township Fire Department provides fire prevention, fire suppression, emergency medical services, and education and safety programs for Washington Township, which encompasses parts of Franklin, Delaware and Union Counties.

Live Safe Foundation is an Ohio based non-profit organization (501c3), devoted to making and fire and life safety education, awareness initiatives and life saving tools available on a broad basis to communities, campuses, and institutions in an effort to reduce national fire fatalities and fire losses.


Outdoor Cooking Safety Makes It More Tasty
Thursday, July 25th, 2013

The taste of a grilled hot dog or burger is hard to beat. Whether you are using propane, charcoal, or electricity, grilling involves hot surfaces and, most of the time, flames. The potential for serious burns and fires warrants caution and safety before, during, and after your cookout.

Use charcoal lighter or fluid on coals only before you start the fire. Never use gasoline to start or revive a fire. Gasoline in its liquid or vapor form can ignite and cause severe burns.

Keep damp or wet coals in a well-ventilated area. During the drying process, spontaneous combustion can occur in confined spaces. If a bag of charcoal gets wet, leave it outside and away from the house.

Outdoor-grilling-safety

Outdoor Cooking Safety Makes it More Tasty!

Use grills where they will not tip over or ignite objects above them. Do not use them on balconies or under awnings. Over one third (33%) of all gas grill and charcoal grill home fires begin on an exterior balcony or unenclosed porch. Keep grills outside of tents and recreational vehicles.

Never use a grill in the home. The carbon monoxide produced by burning charcoal can be dangerous in an enclosed space.

Never leave a lighted grill unattended.

Have a container of water or garden hose ready to extinguish a fire.

Keep children away from fires and grills. They may try to climb on the grill to see what is cooking.

Though coals may appear cold, always soak them after cooking. Carefully douse the coals with water, avoiding splashing and splatters form a garden hose and keep your body clear of steam and smoke.

If you use a grill fueled by liquid propane (LP), check all fuel line connections periodically for leaks by coating them with a solution of soap and water and watching for bubbles, an indicator of a leak.

Light LP-fueled gas grills according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Turn off burner valves and the supply valve on the gas cylinder or tank when the grill in not in use. Never store an LP-fueled grill indoors.

Make sure you have long-handled grilling tools on hand to give the chef at your house plenty of clearance from heat and flames when flipping burgers.

If you need to treat a burn, cool it with cool, not cold, water immediately. Cover the burn with a clean cloth and seek emergency help.

Article Credits: Fire Marshal Alan Perkins, CFPS (Live Safe Foundation, Liaison to the Fire Department Community) – Alan’s career in the fire service spans more than 30 years. He is a Certified Fire Protection Specialist through the National Fire Protection Association and a member of numerous similar safety organizations. Alan consults with numerous fire departments throughout Ohio and in 2005 was chosen by the Ohio Department of Health as the fire service member on the Ohio School Inspection Advisory Committee. He was also awarded Ohio Fire Official of the Year in 2009 by the Ohio Building Officials Association. Alan is the Fire Marshal for the Washington Township Fire Department in Dublin, Ohio. The Washington Township Fire Department provides fire prevention, fire suppression, emergency medical services, and education and safety programs for Washington Township, which encompasses parts of Franklin, Delaware and Union Counties.

Live Safe Foundation is an Ohio based non-profit organization (501c3), devoted to making and fire and life safety education, awareness initiatives and life saving tools available on a broad basis to communities, campuses, and institutions in an effort to reduce national fire fatalities and fire losses.


Importance of knowing how to use Portable Fire Extinguishers
Wednesday, September 26th, 2012

When a fire starts, it is usually small enough to put out quickly if you have the right portable fire extinguisher and know how and when to use it.

Which one should you buy?

Not all fire extinguishers are alike.  Letter(s) indicate the type of fire they can put out:

  • “A” type extinguishers work on fuels such as wood, cloth, paper, rubber, and plastics.
  • “B” type extinguishers work on flammable liquids like gasoline, kerosene, oil, paint, and kitchen grease.

    Properly installed and maintained fire protection systems have played a significant role in the reduction of fire related loss of life and property. Learn to protect your family, colleagues, facilities and physical assets from fire.

  • “C” type extinguishers work on electrical fires.

Purchase a multipurpose extinguisher that is designed to work on more than one fuel type.  Select one with an “BC” or “ABC” rating for typical home use.  Purchase only those extinguishers with the Underwriters Laboratories (UL) or Factory Manual (FM) label. Avoid extinguishers that resemble aerosol cans. They can be dangerous when used.

Pull, Aim, Squeeze and Sweep

1. Most fire extinguishers have a locking pin that prevents the handle from moving. To use the extinguisher, pull the locking pin.

2. Aim at the base of the flames. Aiming is important as the contents of most household extinguishers last less than 10 seconds. You won’t have much time to correct your aim.

3. Squeeze the handle.

4. Sweep back and forth over the burning area.

Storing Your Extinguisher

Mount the extinguisher according to the manufacturer’s recommendation. The most important place to have a fire extinguisher in your home is the kitchen. It is also wise to have one in your garage, workshop, or near and room with a fireplace or open-flame heater.

Check the Pressure

Check the pressure gauge periodically to see if it needs replaced or recharged. Disposable extinguishers can be used only once and must be discarded and replaced even if they have been only partially discharged. Rechargeable extinguishers must be tested and serviced professionally.

Refill or Replace Immediately

Always refill or replace an extinguisher immediately after using it.  Never put it back empty. Consult a professional for filling and recharging.

For more information on fire extinguisher training, contact www.abcofire.com.

Article Credits: Fire Marshal Alan Perkins, CFPS (Live Safe Foundation, Liaison to the Fire Department Community) – Alan’s career in the fire service spans more than 30 years. He is a Certified Fire Protection Specialist through the National Fire Protection Association and a member of numerous similar safety organizations. Alan consults with numerous fire departments throughout Ohio and in 2005 was chosen by the Ohio Department of Health as the fire service member on the Ohio School Inspection Advisory Committee. He was also awarded Ohio Fire Official of the Year in 2009 by the Ohio Building Officials Association. Alan is the Fire Marshal for the Washington Township Fire Department in Dublin, Ohio.

Live Safe Foundation is an Ohio based non-profit organization (501c3), devoted to making and fire and life safety education, awareness initiatives and life saving tools available on a broad basis to communities, campuses, and institutions in an effort to reduce national fire fatalities and fire losses.


Establish a home fire safety plan
Wednesday, July 11th, 2012
People rely on fire and smoke detectors to help keep them safe in their homes. Though fire and smoke alarms are effective, a firm fire safety plan that will keep everyone calm should a fire occur could make the difference between life and death.

The U.S. Fire Administration says that more than 3,500 Americans die each year in fires, while roughly 18,300 more men, women and children are injured each year. Cooking accounts for the greatest percentage of residential fires, followed by arson. Dryer vent fires are also a big concern. FEMA says that smoke, rather than the fire’s flames, is responsible for 75 percent of all deaths by fire.

In addition to physical injury and material damage, fires can cause a host of problems. Psychological distress, monetary damages and loss of pets may come with fires. Loss of irreplaceable personal items is also a concern. Although fires can be devastating, they’re also highly preventable, and smoke alarms and a home fire safety plan are two precautionary measures everyone should take.

Creating an evacuation plan doesn’t have to be complicated. Such a plan can be established in a few minutes and then reinforced through practice every so often to keep everyone fresh on what to do.

Establish a home fire safety plan

People rely on fire and smoke detectors to help keep them safe in their homes. Though fire and smoke alarms are effective, a firm fire safety plan that will keep everyone calm should a fire occur could make the difference between life and death.

• Begin by assessing the layout of the home. Figure out the two best exits from the home.

• If your home doesn’t have two doors, invest in a fire ladder so that one of the windows can be a point of exit.

• Know how to gain access to the exits, including the best path to take to avoid injury. It’s a good idea to consider a few different scenarios. A kitchen adjacent to the upstairs staircase may become engulfed in flames and make exit by way of staircase impossible. Just because you have doors to the outside doesn’t mean they’ll present the best type of exit.

• Sketch out the layout of the home and the escape plan. Smoke can make it difficult to know up from down. Be sure everyone can reach the exits even if vision is obstructed. Try it with your eyes closed.

• Check fire alarms routinely, and change batteries at least every year.

• Make sure windows can be easily opened if they are an exit point.

• Make note of who will be helping children or the elderly out of the home.

• Establish a place where the family will meet outdoors. This area should be far enough away from the home so that everyone will be safe from smoke, flames and falling debris. Fires may ignite fuel explosions, so be sure the meeting spot is a good deal away.

• Children should be instructed to run to the meeting spot immediately without waiting behind for anyone to catch up. No one should reenter the home after arriving at the meeting spot.

• Do a few practice runs so that everyone will be accustomed to getting out quickly.

• While in most cases it is better to escape and let the fire department extinguish a fire, in the event of a small fire, occupants may be able to stanch it with a personal fire extinguisher. Follow the acronym PASS to properly put out the fire.

– PULL the pin in the extinguisher.

– AIM the nozzle or hose at the base of the flames.

– SQUEEZE the trigger.

– SWEEP the foam across the fire base; do not just aim in one place.

Fire safety is very important. In conjunction with smoke alarms, a fire safety plan can help everyone get out alive.

Live Safe Foundation is an Ohio based non-profit organization (501c3), devoted to making and fire and life safety education, awareness initiatives and life saving tools available on a broad basis to communities, campuses, and institutions in an effort to reduce national fire fatalities and fire losses.


Live Safe's Facebook    Live Safe's Twitter    Live Safe's YouTube Live Safe's App

Stop, Drop & Roll Over To Our Partners