Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Posts Tagged ‘Fire Prevention Week’
Testing is Key to Keeping Smoke Alarms Working
Wednesday, October 8th, 2014

Every 82 seconds, a home fire impacts the life of an American family. By providing an early warning and the critical few extra seconds to escape, smoke alarms cut in half your family’s risk of dying in a home fire, but only if they work. Sixty-five percent of reported home fires deaths result from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.

Smoke alarms that are not in proper working order can provide a false sense of security and, without periodic testing, could endanger those who rely on them.

2014-fpw-smokealarms

Testing is Key to Keeping Smoke Alarms Working!

Test your smoke alarms at least once a month following the manufacturer’s instructions. Do not test smoke alarms using a lit candle, match or lighter because of the danger of using an open flame in a residence. In addition, because smoke alarms are not designed to respond to heat or flames, the alarm may not respond to these testing methods even if it is in good working order.  Most residential smoke alarms can be tested by depressing a “test” button, which activates the alarm sound.  If the alarm does not respond when the “test” button is depressed, change the battery or replace the unit if necessary.

Many battery-powered smoke alarms will make an intermittent chirping sound when battery power is low. If a fresh battery does not eliminate the chirping, the cause could be age, improper location, or dust in the unit.

Clean your smoke alarms at least twice a year, using a vacuum cleaner. Dust and cobwebs can weaken the sensitivity of the alarm.

Replace smoke alarm batteries at least once a year. Pick a date that is easy to remember such as daylight saving time.

If you have nuisance alarms caused by steam from cooking, try another location or alarm model. An ionization alarm with a hush button or a photoelectric alarm should be used if the alarm is within 20 feet of a cooking appliance. Always be sure you understand why an alarm is sounding before treating the alarm as a nuisance. Smoke alarms don’t last forever. The National Fire Protection Association recommends that smoke alarms be replaced if they are performing erratically or are more than ten years old.

Doing periodic checks of the smoke alarms in your home should be routine. The time invested to check them is small compared to the benefit they can provide in saving lives.

Guest Contributor & Article Credits: Fire Marshal Alan Perkins, CFPS (Live Safe Foundation, Liaison to the Fire Department Community) – Alan’s career in the fire service spans more than 30 years. He is a Certified Fire Protection Specialist through the National Fire Protection Association and a member of numerous similar safety organizations. Alan consults with numerous fire departments throughout Ohio and in 2005 was chosen by the Ohio Department of Health as the fire service member on the Ohio School Inspection Advisory Committee. He was also awarded Ohio Fire Official of the Year in 2009 by the Ohio Building Officials Association. Alan is the Fire Marshal for the Washington Township Fire Department in Dublin, Ohio. The Washington Township Fire Department provides fire prevention, fire suppression, emergency medical services, and education and safety programs for Washington Township, which encompasses parts of Franklin, Delaware and Union Counties.

Live Safe Foundation is an Ohio based non-profit organization (501c3), devoted to making and fire and life safety education, awareness initiatives and life saving tools available on a broad basis to communities, campuses, and institutions in an effort to reduce national fire fatalities and fire losses.


Smoke Alarms: Up, Down and All Around
Tuesday, September 28th, 2010

Smoke alarms can mean the difference between life and death in a fire. Statistics show that smoke alarms cut the chance of dying in a fire nearly in half, but only if they are working properly.

Data from the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) indicates that many installed smoke detectors aren’t working, usually because of missing, disconnected or dead batteries. Roughly two-thirds of all home fire deaths result from fires with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.

Working smoke alarms should be used in every home, on every level (including the basement), outside each sleeping area and inside each bedroom. And, if a smoke alarm is 10 years old or older, it should be replaced. In addition, the right type of smoke alarm should be used. Which is the right type?

Find out at the upcoming Fire Prevention Week Open House, on October 3rd, 2010, in Dublin, Ohio. Fire Marshal Alan Perkins will be offering presentations at Station 92 (4497 Hard Road) to demonstrate how the two main smoke alarms types work and under what conditions they are most likely to be activated, so you are made aware of the deadly smoke or fire before it overcomes you.

Having a working smoke alarm in your home is not a guarantee that it will sound. I can show you why and how to increase the likelihood of it responding. In addition to smoke alarm presentations, our open house event will feature several family-oriented activities and demonstrations at each of our four fire stations.

So join us in celebrating this year’s Fire Prevention Week theme: “Smoke Alarms: A Sound You Can Live With,” by learning more about smoke alarms and fire safety on October 3rd from 1-4 p.m.

Keep your smoke alarms working by:

•    Testing them at least once a month using the test button, and making sure everyone in your home knows their sound.
•    Replacing the battery immediately if you hear it  “chirping,” an indicator that the battery is low.
•    Replacing them when they are 10 years old or sooner (if they don’t respond properly when tested). This includes hard-wired alarms also.
•    Never removing or disabling them.

Article Credits: Fire Marshal Alan Perkins, CFPS, is a 32-year veteran of the fire service. A Certified Fire Protection Specialist through the National Fire Protection Association and a member of several similar safety organizations. Perkins is the Fire Marshal for the Washington Township Fire Department, Dublin, Ohio. For more information, contact: Leslie Dybiec, Public Information Officer Phone: (614) 652-3928 Fax: (614) 766-2507 or ldybiec@wtwp.com

Live Safe Foundation is an Ohio based non-profit organization (501c3), and leading grassroots movement, devoted to making and fire and life safety education, awareness initiatives and life saving tools available on a broad basis to communities, campuses, and institutions in an effort to reduce national fire fatalities and fire losses. Live Safe aims to help finance fire safety education where means are otherwise unavailable. Live Safe is developing and sponsoring programs to help groups find the resources needed to advance individual and community fire safety.


Join Washington Township Fire Department this weekend for an Open House & Fish with a Firefighter!
Tuesday, September 28th, 2010

Join Washington Township Fire Department this weekend for an Open House!

In addition, Washington Township Fire Department welcomes you to their fall open house. Be sure to stop by the station nearest you from 1 to 4 p.m. For complete details visit http://www.wtwp.com/fire/.

Or enroll in “Fish With a Firefighter”, Sunday, Oct. 10 from 1 – 2:30 p.m. Youth ages 7  11 can learn fishing basics under the expertise and guidance of W.T.F.D. staff. Register for program #424200.01. Participants must bring pole, line and hook, bait is provided.

Register now for Citizen’s Fire Experience on Saturday, October 16th: Join a day of challenge, camaraderie and fun!

•     Wear    full    firefighter    protective    gear    and    fight    a    live    fire;
•     Climb    our    100-foot    ladder    truck;
•     Practice    using    a    fire    extinguisher;
•     Use    the    “jaws    of    life”    and    other    tools    in    a    mock    auto    extrication;
•     Rappel    off    the    third    story    of    our    fire    training    tower.

To register, call 614-652-3920 by October 13, 2010. This    program    is    offered    at    no    charge    to    those    who    reside    or    work    in     Washington    Township    or    Dublin, Ohio.    Must    be    at    least    18    years    old    to participate.

Saturday October 16
9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Held at the Washington    Township    Fire    Training    Center
6200    Eiterman    Road,    Dublin,    Ohio

Be sure to check out the Fire Department’s new YouTube Channel at http://www.youtube.com/user/WashingtonTwpOhio.

Article Credits: Fire Marshal Alan Perkins, CFPS, is a 32-year veteran of the fire service. A Certified Fire Protection Specialist through the National Fire Protection Association and a member of several similar safety organizations. Perkins is the Fire Marshal for the Washington Township Fire Department, Dublin, Ohio. For more information, contact: Leslie Dybiec, Public Information Officer Phone: (614) 652-3928 Fax: (614) 766-2507 or ldybiec@wtwp.com

Live Safe Foundation is an Ohio based non-profit organization (501c3), and leading grassroots movement, devoted to making and fire and life safety education, awareness initiatives and life saving tools available on a broad basis to communities, campuses, and institutions in an effort to reduce national fire fatalities and fire losses. Live Safe aims to help finance fire safety education where means are otherwise unavailable. Live Safe is developing and sponsoring programs to help groups find the resources needed to advance individual and community fire safety.


Fire Prevention Week 2010: “Smoke Alarms: A Sound You Can Live With!”
Tuesday, June 1st, 2010

Plan now for Fire Prevention Week!

This year’s official theme for Fire Prevention Week (FPW), was just announced by the NFPA: “Smoke Alarms: A Sound You Can Live With!”, held this coming October 3-9, 2010.

Fire Prevention Week

This year’s campaign is designed to educate people about the importance of smoke alarms and encourages everyone to take the steps necessary to update and maintain their home smoke alarm protection.

Fire service
Fire service: All the materials you need for your campaign
teachers
Teachers: Lesson plans and letters to send home
Kids and families
Kids and families: Learning about fire safety can be fun

Article Credits: www.nfpa.org

Be sure to follow the Live Safe Foundation for the latest on local events related to fire safety. Live Safe is an Ohio based non-profit organization (501c3), and leading grassroots movement, devoted to making fire safety education, awareness initiatives and life saving tools available on a broad basis to communities, campuses, and institutions in an effort to reduce national fire fatalities and fire losses. Live Safe aims to help finance fire safety education where means are otherwise unavailable. Live Safe is developing and sponsoring programs to help groups find the resources needed to advance individual and community fire safety.


SFPE provides boost to OSU Burn Center at Charity Golf Outing
Monday, October 12th, 2009

Fires consumes millions of dollars of property each year in the United States. These fires kill more than 5,000 people with 1,100 of them being children.  Countless numbers, including firefighters, are injured in fires and struggle with painful burn injuries.  The saddest fact of all is that it can be prevented by installing early warning devices (such as smoke detectors) and automatic fire suppression systems.

Fire Protection industry supporters (OSU Medical Center Burn Center and Central Ohio Chapter of the Society of Fire Protection Engineers), have come together to educate the public as to the extensive damage fire causes and how they can be a part of the solution to the problem by requiring properly designed automatic fire suppression systems not only where they work, but where they live, play, shop, go to school and worship.  Together we are making things happen!

Through the support of the SFPE COC community, The Ohio State University Medical Center’s Burn Center received a major boost through their annual charity golf event on Monday, October 5th, 2009 at The Lakes Golf and Country Club. Since 1998 (traditionally kicked off during Fire Prevention Week) the Society of Fire Protection Engineers and its members have generously contributed $212,500 to the Burn Center at Ohio State University Medical Center. These funds have allowed the Ohio State Burn Center to continue to be actively involved in providing education on burn prevention and fire safety both to the community and the students on campus, as well as helping patients obtain special items or assistance such as compression garments which are not covered under insurance. The fund also provides direct support and assistance to patients, their families and advanced education to burn care nurses. 

As a member of the SFPE planning Board, Live Safe Foundation Founder, Jill Marcinick, volunteered and assisted in event planning for the 20th Annual SFPE/OSU Burn Center Golf Outing. The event featured over 120 participants, all supporting the OSU Burn Center. Participants enjoyed a beautiful Autumn day on the golf course along with OSU Alumni President and 2 time Heisman Trophy Winner Archie Griffin who participated in the event. Archie Griffin attended the event to help support the cause and raise awareness for the OSU Burn Center.

SFPEOSUGolfOuting

SFPE Golf participant & Archie Griffin

 

Post golf festivities included a terrific Silent Auction, Raffle, Course Games, and a Check Ceremony providing a $20,000 check to Dr. Sidney Miller of the OSU Burn Center. A highlight of the evening was a heartfelt testimony from Guest Keynote Speaker, Firefighter Pat Malone, who shared his story of recovery from a tragic burn incident resulting from a Flashover that occurred last October 31, 2008. He expressed his sincere appreciation for the excellent care and therapy he received from the team of doctors at the OSU Burn Center.

Funds raised from the event are allocated to enhance education and prevention programs, as well as patient care.

Education:

  • Community Outreach provides Burn and Fire Prevention programs at Fire Stations and schools.
  • On-Campus Community Outreach activities provide education and literature to students as they arrive or return to campus. 
  • Ohio State’s Burn Center also participates in Burn Prevention Week, Fire Prevention Week and Homecoming activities to increase awareness of fire safety and prevention on-campus. 
  • Provider Education is conducted through programs such as ABLS education to burn care givers, the Fire Fighter for a Day program, as well as, providing education to staff through conferences and seminars. 

Patient Care:

  • Burn Discharge Dressing Kits have been provided to patients being discharged from care and are able to maintain care for their wounds at home. 
  • Buckeye Burn Support Group provides professional support and guidance to burn survivors and their families to help survivors resume functional, productive lives. 
  • Special items such as pressure garments, wigs, and equipment are purchased for patients who are otherwise unable to obtain these items. 
  • Additional assistance is provided to help patients with special needs in obtaining housing and clothing. 

Fire sprinklers and extinguishers can make a difference, and you can too. Let’s fight this burning issue together!

For more information contact SFPE Member: Jill Marcinick, Founder of Live Safe. (If you have additional questions regarding Ohio State’s Burn Center education and programs, please contact Chris Casavant (OSU Burn Program Manager) at (614) 336-8374.)


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