Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Posts Tagged ‘weather’
NOAA Weather Radio Is Important Safety Device
Monday, April 13th, 2015

Smoke and carbon monoxide alarms are now considered standard safety devices in homes. Another equally valuable yet less common safety device for the home or business is a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio. With severe weather seemingly ever present in our daily lives, reports from NOAA can give you the information you need to make important decisions that will affect your life and the lives of your family members. The NOAA Weather Radio broadcast contains information about all types of severe weather including tornado and flood warnings as soon as it is available, not on a scheduled interval or in conjunction with a TV or radio broadcast.

NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards, a component of the nation’s Emergency Alert System, is comprised of a nationwide network of numerous transmitters directly linked with one of 123 local offices of NOAA’s National Weather Service. The closest office is the Wilmington, Ohio location which broadcast weather warnings that cannot be heard on a simple AM/FM receiver. With Ohio’s Spring Severe Weather Awareness Week (March 1-7) upon us, plan on adding a NOAA Weather Radio to your home with these important features:

• A special tone that precedes the initial broadcast regarding immediate weather threats to gain the listener’s attention. This feature is especially crucial when severe storms strike at night when most people are sound asleep.

• The units are small and require little space on a nightstand or table. They are especially convenient for vacations and will use the signal from a nearby transmitter.

• A battery back-up that ensures the receiver continues service during a loss of electricity as the warning capabilities of television or the internet will be lost.

• S.A.M.E. (Specific Area Message Encoding) technology that can be programmed to sound only select alerts for specific areas such as Franklin County. This prevents undesired messages and false alarms, especially those outside the local area.

• Many radios allow for customization for the hearing or visually impaired, such as strobe lights, or bed shakers.

• Units that receive the NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards signal are available at many electronic retail stores and range in cost from $20 to $100. Look for receivers which carry the Public Alert logo (CEA-2009). Devices carrying the logo meet certain technical standards and come with the features mentioned. The National Weather Service does not manufacture these receivers.

Visit the Township’s website at www.wtwp.com to download your 65-page Emergency Preparedness Guide or stop by our Administration building at 6200 Eiterman Road for your free copy.

Guest Contributor & Article Credits: Fire Marshal Alan Perkins, CFPS (Live Safe Foundation, Liaison to the Fire Department Community) – Alan’s career in the fire service spans more than 30 years. He is a Certified Fire Protection Specialist through the National Fire Protection Association and a member of numerous similar safety organizations. Alan consults with numerous fire departments throughout Ohio and in 2005 was chosen by the Ohio Department of Health as the fire service member on the Ohio School Inspection Advisory Committee. He was also awarded Ohio Fire Official of the Year in 2009 by the Ohio Building Officials Association. Alan is the Fire Marshal for the Washington Township Fire Department in Dublin, Ohio. The Washington Township Fire Department provides fire prevention, fire suppression, emergency medical services, and education and safety programs for Washington Township, which encompasses parts of Franklin, Delaware and Union Counties.

Live Safe Foundation is an Ohio based non-profit organization (501c3), devoted to making and fire and life safety education, awareness initiatives and life saving tools available on a broad basis to communities, campuses, and institutions in an effort to reduce national fire fatalities and fire losses.


When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors
Thursday, June 16th, 2011

Did you know that all thunderstorms produce lightning and lightning can strike as far as ten miles away from any rainfall? Many deaths from lightning occur ahead of the storm because people wait to the last minute before seeking shelter. According to the National Weather Service, 29 people were killed by lightning last year. Hundreds more were struck and survived, suffering life-long injury and or permanent disability.

If you are outdoors and see lightning, move indoors to a completely enclosed building or into a hard-topped vehicle and close the windows. Avoid being in or near high places and open fields, isolated trees, unprotected gazebos, car ports, pavilions, tents, shelters, baseball dugouts, flagpoles, light poles, metal or wood bleachers, metal fences, and water. Don’t hold on to metal items such as golf clubs, umbrellas or tools.

To determine how far a thunderstorm is from you, use the 30-30 Rule. When you see lightning, count the number of seconds that pass until you hear thunder.  If you hear thunder within 30 seconds of seeing lightning, the storm is within six miles. Seek shelter immediately. Wait at least 30 minutes after the last clap of thunder before leaving shelter.

If you are at home when a storm is expected, unplug major or unnecessary appliances such as televisions and air conditioners, as power surges can damage appliances beyond repair. Avoid using corded phones or any electrical appliances.

When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors!

Lightning can enter your home as a direct strike, through wires or pipes that extend outside your home (i.e. water, gas pipes), or through the ground. Once it makes it into your home, the current generated by the lightning strike can travel through electrical lines, plumbing, phone lines, radio or television reception systems. Flexible gas line is more susceptible to lightning damage than iron pipe. Look, listen and smell for gas leaks and any evidence of a fire. If the fire is small (smoldering) and in a remote location such as the crawl space, basement, or attic, you may not be able to see flames but you can often smell or see smoke.

If you detect any unusual odors or see any smoke, call 9-1-1 immediately.

National Lightning Safety Awareness Week is June 19-25. Take a few minutes this week to make sure your family members know what to do when they are outside or at home and hear thunder. Don’t wait for the rain to begin to take shelter. A comprehensive list of safety tips and other lightning resources are available at http://www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov .

Article Credits: Fire Marshal Alan Perkins, CFPS, is a 32-year veteran of the fire service. A Certified Fire Protection Specialist through the National Fire Protection Association and a member of several similar safety organizations. Perkins is the Fire Marshal for the Washington Township Fire Department, Dublin, Ohio. For more information, contact: Leslie Dybiec, Public Information Officer Phone: (614) 652-3928 Fax: (614) 766-2507 or ldybiec@wtwp.com.

Live Safe Foundation is an Ohio based non-profit organization (501c3), and leading grassroots movement, devoted to making and fire and life safety education, awareness initiatives and life saving tools available on a broad basis to communities, campuses, and institutions in an effort to reduce national fire fatalities and fire losses. Live Safe aims to help finance fire safety education where means are otherwise unavailable. Live Safe is developing and sponsoring programs to help groups find the resources needed to advance individual and community fire safety.


March 20-26 is Spring Severe Weather Awareness Week in Ohio
Friday, March 18th, 2011

March 20-26 is Spring Severe Weather Awareness Week in Ohio. Franklin County Emergency Management and Homeland Security urges you to exercise your tornado safety plan during the Statewide Tornado Drill at 9:50 a.m. Wednesday, March 23. Tornadoes can strike anytime — there have been 27 tornadoes in Franklin County since 1950. Designing and exercising a tornado safety plan for your establishment will help you respond appropriately in a real event.

Also, please inform us of your drill participation in an online survey (click here) that will take only a couple of minutes to fill out. We will email you a certificate of participation in return. Please provide your email address in your survey response to help ensure you receive future emails about the annual Statewide Tornado Drill.

Here’s how to participate in the 2011 Tornado Drill:

  • Listen for the outdoor sirens at 9:50 a.m. March 23.
  • Practice your safety plan — go to your designated tornado shelter.
  • Tell us about your participation and provide your email address in our online survey. Click on the link above or go to http://www.franklincountyohio.gov/emahs/ survey.htm.

Preparedness Tips –

One of the 172 outdoor warning sirens in Franklin County.

  • Get a weather alert radio. They’re available from most electronics retailers. To learn more, go towww.nws.noaa.gov/nwr/.
  • Learn about the hazards we face in Franklin County at the FCEM&HS Web site: www.franklincountyohio.gov/emahs.
  • Take a class like Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) training. Visit our Web site and click “Volunteers.”

Make a Plan:

  • Know a safe place to shelter during tornadoes at work, home or school.
  • Keep extra emergency supplies on hand (battery-operated radio, food, water, medication).
  • Go online to Ready.Gov to learn how to make an emergency plan.

Get Involved:

  • Exercise your tornado plan on March 23 at 9:50 a.m. during the statewide drill and share your results with us in the online survey.
  • If you can’t drill on March 23, choose another date in March or April and share your results with us online.
  • Volunteer for five minutes each week monitoring the Franklin County Outdoor Warning Siren System during weekly siren tests.  Get details here.

For more information, please visit the Franklin County Emergency Management and Homeland Security on the Web at www.franklincountyohio.gov/ emahs.

Live Safe Foundation is an Ohio based non-profit organization (501c3), and leading grassroots movement, devoted to making and fire and life safety education, awareness initiatives and life saving tools available on a broad basis to communities, campuses, and institutions in an effort to reduce national fire fatalities and fire losses. Live Safe aims to help finance fire safety education where means are otherwise unavailable. Live Safe is developing and sponsoring programs to help groups find the resources needed to advance individual and community fire safety.



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